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20120925
20121003
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LINKTV 2
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LINKTV
Sep 27, 2012 11:30am PDT
's government. nike doesn't own these factories. production cane moved at very short notice. that means nike could stop producing here if wages became too expensive. but according to cliff pannell, that'snlikely. pannell: the labor force in china is huge. there are, uh, over 600 million people at work in china. uh, most of them are still in the agricultural sector of the economy. and there are too many. there are probably at least a hundred million redundant laborers in the agricultural work force. what to do with them? how to make them more productive? well, one thing is you've got to enhance their mobility and allow them to go where the jobs are, and the jobs are down in places like guangdong province and the pearl river delta. new factories are building, a lot of new construction workers are needed, transportation workers are needed, factory workers are needed. narrator: and here we can begin to see the local impact of the powerful forces at play in this globalizing economy. migration, urbanization, cultural and social change are echoing across this region. pannell: this is going toe one
LINKTV
Oct 2, 2012 11:30am PDT
government agreed to sell two of their best raphaels. one was the alba madonna, for which mellon offered the highest price ever paid for a painting up to that time. the other was raphael's small saint george and the dragon, an early work with an illustrious history. along with the rest of his collection, mellon's three raphaels formed the nucleus of the national gallery, founded in 1937 and opened to the public in 1941. president franklin roosevelt: "this national gallery and the collections it contains..." narrator: the raphaels in the national gallery were joined by another painting by the artist, the portit of bindo altoviti, purchased by chain store magnate samuel kress. on berenson's recommendation, kress bought the portrait from a european museum. today, it is generally accepted as a work by the master's hand. it was not only nostalgia for the past which led american collectors to pursue raphael, nor was it merely rivalry with each other. these collectors shared a sense of cultural responsibility. the raphaels, once in private hands, are now all in public museums where they can be
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2